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Orange County Board of Supervisors Chairman, Bill Campbell, Celebrates St. Patrick’s Day with a Different Kind of Green

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 17, 2011

(Santa Ana, CA) —Chairman Bill Campbell today planted two Coast Live Oak saplings in their new home at Santiago Oaks Regional Park, taking part in a park restoration project that is also a mitigation measure being fulfilled by OC Waste & Recycling.

“This park is one of Orange County’s beauties, and I was heartbroken when nearly 90 per cent of the park was affected by the Windy Ridge Fire in 2007,” said Chairman Campbell. “When OC Waste & Recycling needed to find a place to plant oak trees as a mitigation measure for the Olinda Alpha Landfill expansion, Santiago Oaks was the natural match.”

A total of 110 oak trees must be replaced, according to the mitigation requirements. But planting is not enough. The trees need to be nurtured along in order to thrive. This calls for a ten-year mitigation monitoring plan to ensure the project’s success. In fact, 200 saplings will be planted to be sure that the project yields the required 110 oak trees.

The trees will be planted along the Santiago Creek Trail in Santiago Oaks, providing future shade for hikers, bicyclists, and equestrians. The classic Coast Live Oak Tree canopy that is the hallmark of Santiago Oaks Regional Park will return—though not for a few decades.

Chairman Campbell revealed his Irish roots when he said, “I think this is a great way to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. It really is a new kind of green. There’s nothing greener than a park on St Patrick’s Day!”

Background
On March 11, 2007, a vegetation fire started near the Windy Ridge Toll Plaza of the 241 Toll Road. Fueled by heavy winds and dry vegetation, the fire spread in a southwesterly direction, burning 2,036 acres.

Nearly 90 percent of Santiago Oaks Regional Park was affected by the fire. The OC Park Rangers, their staff and park volunteers have worked hard to protect the park’s fragile landscape. The oak tree restoration project is a great way to help the park’s recovery.

At the Olinda Alpha landfill, development of the next phase called for the removal of 11 oak trees. The removal of the trees must be mitigated by planting new ones—at an approximate ratio of ten to one. OC Waste & Recycling began to look for possible locations for planting the oak trees. Santiago Oaks offered the perfect match.

Contacts: Julie Chay 
julie.chay@ocwr.ocgov.com 
714-834-4059 
Mobile: 714-679-4470 

Marisa O’Neil
marisa.o'neil@ocparks.com 
714-973-6870
Mobile: 714-310-5478